Art Gallery

CHANEL SPRING 2014 READY-TO-WEAR

PARIS, OCTOBER 1, 2013

Art! You can scarcely pick up a magazine or newspaper these days without coming across something about the volatility of the art world, the millions that are being spent in the getting of pictures on which the paint is scarcely dry.  The Grand Palais was transformed into a gigantic white-walled hangar of paintings and sculptures all seventy-five of them made by Lagerfeld during his Summer of Prodigious Creativity. He didn't actually make them himself—that feat would be too Olympian even for Karl—but he drew the pieces or made maquettes so his studio could realize the finished product. Just like Jeff Koons. And, as with Koons, Karl's reference points were identifiable, though he cleverly twisted them so they each included some element of Chanel: a camellia, a pearl, a bottle of No. 5. The coming together of concept and design was clearly responsible for the way Lagerfeld's theme infected his collection to a greater degree than usual. "Transformative!" was Koons' response when he was asked about the common ground between art and fashion, and the transformations the Chanel atelier achieved with the signature tweeds were nothing short of art. In fact, they weren't even tweed as we know it: They were some indefinable multi-processed hybrid of de- and reconstructed stuff that was then mounted on tulle to create outfits that were identifiable as iconic Chanel. Deconstruction, trompe l'oeil, collage, bricolage - this Chanel collection was a fest of art processes.

by TIM BLANKS - Vogue.com

 © 2019 by Matteo Menotto. All images presented in this website are for pure information only and cannot be reproduced without writtien permission of the author

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